California Set To Increase Minimum Wage On July 1st; San Francisco Increases Rates Under Health Care Security Ordinance Along With Higher Minimum Wage

California employers must be aware that the state’s minimum wage increases to $9 per hour on Tuesday, July 1st.  This is the first increase in the state minimum wage in six years, and represents a $1 per hour increase from the previous minimum wage of $8 per hour. This new minimum wage is only temporary, and will increase to $10 per hour on January 1, 2016.

Low-end, hourly employees are not the only employees who are affected by this increase, however.  It is also important to remember that California law also requires salaried, exempt employees to earn a monthly salary equivalent of no less than two times the new state minimum wage for full-time employment.  Consequently, even some exempt employees will see an increase in their salary as a result of the minimum wage increase.  Effective July 1st, the new minimum monthly salary for exempt employees will be $3,120, or $37,440 per year.

It is also important to remember that effective January 1, 2014, the City and County of San Francisco increased its minimum wage for all employees working in San Francisco to $10.74 per hour.  The notice that San Francisco requires its employers to post can be found and printed here.

Not to be outdone by the City of Seattle, San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee recently proposed a measure to increase San Francisco’s minimum wage to $15 per hour by July 2018.  Voters will have the opportunity to weigh in on Mayor Lee’s proposal in the upcoming November ballot.  Even if Mayor Lee’s proposal is voted down (which seems unlikely given the proposal’s support), San Francisco’s minimum wage is already set to increase to $11.03 on January 1, 2015.

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors also recently voted to increase employers’ expenditures under the Health Care Security Ordinance (“HCSO”).  Under the HCSO, employers must satisfy the Employer Spending Requirement by calculating and making required health care expenditures on behalf of all covered employees. Effective January 1, 2015, these expenditures are set to increase, depending on the number of employees.  The notice that San Francisco requires its employers to post regarding the HCSO can be found and printed here.  For more information on the HSCO in general, please click here.

The HSCO and the proposed increase to its minimum wage rate are additional examples of employment-related ordinances unique to the City and County of San Francisco. Employers should recall San Francisco’s Commuter Benefits, Family Friendly Workplace, and Paid Sick Leave.

Any employers interested in discussing or implementing any of the above changes to California and San Francisco law or any other employment-related policy or practice (or even the recent woes of the San Francisco Giants) are encouraged to contact Ryan McCoy in CDF’s San Francisco office.

Administration of FMLA Leave for Same-Sex Spouses Gets Easier Under Proposed Rule

The Department of Labor (“DOL”) has announced a notice of proposed rulemaking to revise the definition of “spouse” under the FMLA to make it clear that the FMLA applies to legally married same-sex spouses, regardless of where they live.  Before last year, the FMLA applied only to opposite sex spouses.  Last year, the United States Supreme Court issued its decision in United States v. Windsor, holding that federal laws that discriminate against same-sex married couples are unconstitutional.  As a result of the Windsor decision, the FMLA’s provisions allowing family and medical leave to care for a “spouse” became applicable not only to opposite-sex spouses but also to same-sex spouses – so long as the employee requesting leave resides in a state that recognizes same-sex marriage.  This is because the FMLA currently defines “spouse” in a way that is tied to the law of the state where the employee resides.  The problem with the current spousal definition is that many states still do not recognize same-sex marriage, and even if an employee was married in a state that does recognize same-sex marriage, he or she technically is not eligible for FMLA leave (to care for a spouse) if currently living in a state that does not recognize same-sex marriage.  This has resulted in administration difficulties for employers, many of whom would prefer not to have to engage in an inquiry about whether the employee resides in a state that recognizes same-sex marriage in order to determine whether to allow the employee leave.  However, employers who have decided that they will provide the same leave benefits to same-sex spouses regardless of the state in which they reside, run the risk of deducting from an employee’s FMLA leave bank if the employee actually resides in a state that does not recognize same-sex marriage.  Because the FMLA technically does not apply to spousal leave for that employee, any leave allowed should not be deducted from the employee’s FMLA leave bank.  If the leave was deducted and the employee improperly was deemed to have exhausted all available leave only to later be denied leave that did fall under the FMLA, the employer could face liability for wrongful denial of FMLA leave.

The proposed amendment to the FMLA’s “spouse” definition eliminates this problem.  Under the proposed rule, “spouse” would be defined to include individuals legally married in any state (including common law marriage where recognized under the law of the state).  The definition would also extend to individuals validly married abroad if the individuals could have been legally married in any U.S. state.

The proposed rule has not yet been published in the Federal Register.  Once it is, it will be subject to a public comment period and approval process before it is actually approved and implemented.  We will keep you posted of developments in this regard.  Employers covered by the FMLA will want to follow these developments and, once the rule is finalized, revise their FMLA policies and practices to ensure that their FMLA administration practices are in compliance with the new rule.  The DOL’s notice of proposed rulemaking is available here.  Additional information, including answers to frequently asked questions, are available here and on the DOL’s website.

California Minimum Wage Bill and Mandatory Sick Leave Bill Moving Forward

Last week, SB 935 (Leno) passed through the California Senate.  SB 935 provides for additional increases in the California minimum wage.  Under the current language of the bill, if enacted, the California minimum wage would move to $11 an hour in January 2015, $12 an hour in January 2016, and $13 an hour in January 2017.  Increases in 2018 and thereafter would be based upon inflation.  The bill specifically provides that the California Industrial Welfare Commission would not have authority to lower the minimum wage during periods of negative inflation.  We expect SB 935 to pass the Assembly as well.  It is unclear if Governor Brown would sign it.

AB 1522 also passed its first legislative house last week.  AB 1522 (Gonzalez), also referred to as the Healthy Workplaces – Healthy Families Act of 2014,  provides that any employee who works in the State of California for more than 7 days in a calendar year shall accrue paid sick leave at the rate of one hour for every 30 hours worked and would be able to use sick time at a rate of 24 hours per year after 90 days of employment.   Under the terms of AB 1522, paid sick leave could be used for the employee’s illness or that of a family member as well as for any leave related to domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking.  AB 1522 provides for a collective bargaining exception, as long as the CBA provides for some sick days.  We expect AB 1522 to pass the Senate as well and anticipate that most of the important lobbying on this bill will occur at the Governor’s office.

S.F. Bay Area Employers Must Provide Commuter Benefits by September 30

The Bay Area Commuter Benefits Program, SB 1339, was enacted in 2012 to allow two local Bay Area agencies—the Metropolitan Transportation Commission and the Bay Area Air Quality Management District—to jointly adopt a commuter benefit ordinance requiring  employers to offer commuter benefits to covered employees.  These agencies have now adopted a Commuter Benefit rule requiring larger Bay Area employers to offer specified commuter benefits to covered employees by September 30, 2014 as a means of encouraging carpooling and use of public transporation.

Covered Employers

The new Rule applies to employers with an average of 50 or more full-time (30 hours of work per week) employees performing work within the following nine Bay Area counties:  Alameda, Contra Costa, San Mateo, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, Santa Clara, southern Sonoma County, and southwestern Solano County.  For purposes of determining whether an employer has an average of at least 50 employees, the look back period is the most recent three month period.

Covered Employees

The Rule requires covered employers to provide the commuter benefits described below to employees who perform an average of at least 20 hours of work per week (the average looks back to the previous calendar month) within the counties listed above, excluding a seasonal or temporary employee (an employee who works 120 days or less within the calendar year).

Required Commuter Benefits

By September 30, 2014, covered employers must offer at least one of the following commuter benefit options to covered employees:

  • Pre-tax option:  A program, consistent with section 132(f) of the Internal Revenue Code, allowing covered employees to elect to exclude from taxable wages costs incurred for transit (bus, rail or ferry) passes or vanpool (a vehicle with a carrying capacity of at least six adults, not including the driver) charges, up to $130 per month;
  • Employer-paid benefit:  A program whereby the employer pays employees a subsidy of up to $75 to cover the cost of commuting via transit or by vanpool; or
  • Employer-provided transit:  transportation provided by the employer to covered employees at no cost or low-cost via bus, shuttle, or vanpool.

In lieu of these options, an employer may offer an alternative benefit that provides at least the same reduction in single-occupancy vehicle trips as the three options identified above.  Any alternative benefit must be submitted to and approved, in writing, by the Bay Area Air Quality Management District.

Administrative Requirements

Covered employers are required to designate a Commuter Benefits Coordinator who is responsible for implementing the employer’s commuter benefit program and for complying with the Rule.  Covered employers must also register online with the Bay Area Air Quality Management District and provide specified information before September 30 and annually thereafter.  Covered employers must also provide notice of the Rule and the employer’s commuter benefits to covered employees.  Finally, the Rule imposes a recordkeeping requirement of 3 years for records establishing compliance with the Rule.

For more information and for registration obligation details, click here.

Employees to Be Allowed to Record Liens Against Employer Property for Alleged Unpaid Wages?  Whaaat?

Just when you think that California cannot get any more employer-unfriendly, the California Legislature reminds us that it actually can.  The latest reminder is legislation that was recently introduced by Democratic Assemblyman Mark Stone (AB 2416) to allow employees to record liens against their employers’ property for alleged unpaid wages.  That’s right—alleged.  In order to record a lien, the employee does not need to have proven his entitlement to unpaid wages in a court action or Labor Commissioner proceeding or otherwise.  It is only after the lien is recorded that the employee must prove up the lien by demonstrating that he is actually owed the unpaid wages.  If the employee succeeds, he is also entitled to recover attorneys’ fees and costs.  A lien can also be recorded and enforced by a group of employees or by a government agency (e.g. the DLSE).  The only way the employer can avoid the lien is by obtaining a surety bond (similar to that required to stay a money judgment pending appeal), which is itself a costly procedure.

At least there’s some faint protective relief built in to the legislation for employers--well, sort of.  If an employer defeats an action to enforce a lien, the employer can, in very limited circumstances, recover its attorneys’ fees and costs IF the employer can prove that the employee’s action was brought unreasonably and in bad faith.  (Conversely, the employee of course automatically gets awarded his attorneys’ fees and costs if he proves entitlement to unpaid wages, regardless of whether the wage withholding was in good faith.)

The proposed legislation has exclusions for employees covered by collective bargaining agreements if certain specified conditions are met, and also excludes employees who are exempt administrative, professional or executive employees (of course, the employee can challenge his exempt status and thereby avoid this exclusion, and the legislation specifically states that it is the employer’s burden to prove, as an affirmative defense, that the employee meets the test for exemption).

Employers should voice their opposition to this unnecessary legislation, which has already passed one labor committee and, if enacted, will provide one more tool for the plaintiffs’ employment bar to use to pressure employers to settle wage and hour claims, particularly those brought on behalf of a class of employees.  The text of the proposed legislation is available here.

San Francisco Employers Must Limit Criminal History Inquiries

San Francisco has joined several other cities in enacting “ban the box” legislation to restrict the ability of private employers to inquire about and consider criminal history information for employment purposes.  San Francisco’s recently enacted Fair Chance Ordinance takes effect August 13, 2014.  The Ordinance applies to private employers located or doing business in the City and County of San Francisco with 20 or more employees (including owners and regardless of where the employees work).  The Ordinance’s protections apply to applicants or employees whose place of employment is entirely or substantially located in San Francisco.

The Ordinance prohibits covered employers from making any inquiry regarding criminal history until after an initial job interview.  The Ordinance specifically prohibits “check the box” type questions regarding criminal history on employment applications.  In addition to prohibiting direct inquiry of an applicant or employee, the Ordinance also specifies that employers may not indirectly inquire about criminal history through the use of a background check or other means until after an initial interview.  Furthermore, prior to conducting any criminal history inquiry, the employer must provide the applicant or employee with a written notice of their rights under the Ordinance.  This notice, along with a required workplace poster, will be prepared and published by San Francisco’s Office of Labor Standards Enforcement (OLSE).

In addition to restricting the timing of any criminal history inquiry, the Ordinance also restricts the scope of any such inquiry as well as an employer’s permissible response to learning that an applicant or employee indeed has a criminal background.  The Ordinance completely prohibits employers from inquiring about or considering (1) arrests that did not result in a conviction (unless an investigation or charges are currently pending); (2) completion of a diversion program; (3) sealed or juvenile offenses; (4) offenses that are more than seven years old from the date of sentencing; and (5) offenses that are not felonies or misdemeanors (such as infractions).  Even if an employer learns of criminal history information, the employer is limited in its ability to consider that information as a bar to employment.  The Ordinance requires that the employer conduct an individualized assessment of the nature of the offense as it relates to the specific job position at issue.  The offense may only be considered if it has a “direct and specific negative bearing on that person’s ability to perform the duties or responsibilities necessarily related to the employment position.”  In this regard, the employer must consider whether the position “offers the opportunity for the same or a similar offense to occur” and whether “circumstances leading to the conduct for which the person was convicted . . . will recur.”  The employer must also consider the amount of time that has elapsed since the conviction and consider any mitigating factors and rehabilitation efforts specific to the individual applicant or employee.

If an employer decides to take adverse action based on criminal history information (e.g. refusal to hire or promote), the employer must first notify the applicant or employee of the intended decision in writing (and provide a copy of the background check or criminal conviction report) and allow the applicant or employee seven days to respond with any evidence of inaccuracy in the information or to describe any mitigating factors or rehabilitation.  After receiving such a response, the employer must wait a reasonable time to evaluate the information and reconsider the intended action before making a final decision.  If the employer decides to proceed with the adverse action, it must notify the employee of that decision and that it was based on the criminal history information.

The Ordinance requires covered employers to retain records (including application forms and other related records) for three years.  Covered employers are also affirmatively required to state on all job solicitations or advertisements that the employer will consider for employment qualified applicants with criminal histories in a manner consistent with the Ordinance.

The OLSE may investigate compliance and violations of the Ordinance and may award appropriate relief to an applicant or employee, as well as impose penalties against an employer.  The OLSE may also file a civil action against an employer for a violation of the ordinance.

Employers are reminded that they have separate obligations to comply with the Fair Credit Reporting Act as well as California’s Investigative Consumer Reporting Agencies Act.  Both of these acts regulate the process of conducting background checks for employment purposes and overlap in some ways with the requirements of the San Francisco Ordinance.  Additionally, employers are reminded that the EEOC recently published its own guidance on the use of criminal background checks for employment purposes and has stepped up its enforcement efforts in this area.  Employers are urged to review their criminal background check practices for compliance, and San Francisco employers must additionally ensure more specific compliance with the new San Francisco Ordinance.  The text of the Ordinance is available here.  

Obama to Seek to Narrow Federal Overtime Exemptions

News media are widely reporting that President Obama intends this week to direct the Department of Labor to materially revise the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) regulations pertaining to overtime exemptions so that fewer employees will qualify for an exemption from overtime.  Obama's move relies on his executive authority to revise the rules that carry out the FLSA.  Obama is relying on this executive authority to carry out his pro-worker agenda, as a means of sidestepping the need to pass actual legislation that likely would be blocked by Republicans in Congress.

While the details of the intended revisions have not yet been announced, it is reported that Obama will be urging at least two significant changes:  (1) an increase in the amount of minimum compensation that must be paid to an employee in order for the employee to qualify for exempt status (the minimum currently is $455 per week under the FLSA, and Obama is expected to direct that the minimum be substantially increased, with some urging that it be doubled); and (2) replacing the FLSA "primary duty" test with a more quantitative test that requires an employee to spend a certain percentage of his or her time (likely at least 50%) on exempt duties in order to qualify for exempt status.  These changes would substantially decrease the number of employees who qualify for overtime exemption under the FLSA, and would also likely substantially increase the number of wage and hour lawsuits (already soaring) filed against employers to challenge exempt status and seek unpaid overtime compensation.  Business groups are expected to vigorously oppose the intended overhaul of the regulations.

So what does this mean for California employers?  Probably not much.  California employers are already subject to more narrow overtime exemption laws under California law.  To qualify for exemption in California, an employee (among other things) must be paid a guaranteed salary of at least $640 per week (rising to $800 per week in 2016) and must spend more than 50% of his or her weekly work time on exempt duties.  Thus, the changes being contemplated by the White House are already in effect in California, and the Obama administration appears to be looking to California's laws as guidance in revising the FLSA's overtime exemptions.  This is not good news for employers.

Proposed Amendments to CFRA Regulations Published

On February 21, 2014, California's Department of Fair Employment and Housing Council (FEHC) published proposed amendments to the California Family Rights Act (CFRA) regulations.  These regulations are intended to clarify some aspects of the existing regulations and also to adopt many of the recent amendments to the federal FMLA regulations to make the two acts more consistent.  The proposed amended regulations touch on almost every aspect of the CFRA process, addressing, among other things, length of service/eligibility issues, the certification process and timeframes for responding to employee requests for CFRA leave, computation of amount of leave entitlements, key employee issues, clarification of reinstatement rights, maintenance of health and other benefits during leave, retroactive desingation of leave, and the interplay between CFRA leave and California pregnancy disability leave. The proposed regulations make clear that same-sex spouses are covered under CFRA and make clear that the FMLA regulations apply to CFRA leave "to the extent not inconsistent" with the CFRA regulations.  Importantly, there remain some areas where CFRA administration will continue to differ from FMLA administration.  Among other things, pregnancy disability is not covered under CFRA and, therefore, a California employee who is otherwise eligible for leave under CFRA/FMLA will be eligible for up to four months of leave for pregnancy disability AND up to twelve weeks of additional leave for baby-bonding under CFRA.  The proposed regulations make clear that a California employer is required to maintain the employee's group health benefits for this whole time period (and not just up to 12 weeks).  Some other notable differences between CFRA and FMLA are that the medical certification and scope of permissible medical inquiry are narrower under California law than under FMLA, and the circumstances under which an employer can seek re-certification are narrower under California law.  The proposed regulations provide a sample medical certification that California employers can use.  (In this author's opinion, the proposed certification is insufficient as it relates to intermittent leave needs).

Employers covered by CFRA should carefully review the proposed regulations and consider whether to submit comments and/or proposed revisions.  The full text of the proposed amended regulations is available here.  There is a public comment period through June 2, 2014.  Comments can be submitted via email to FEHCouncil@dfeh.ca.gov.  There will also be two public hearings on the proposed amended regulations:  10:00 a.m. on April 7, 2014 at UC Irvine School of Law, and 10:00 a.m. on June 2, 2014 at the California Public Utilities Commission Main Auditorium in San Francisco.  For more information, see the DFEH website here.

IRS Announces New Mileage Reimbursement Rate

Yesterday the IRS announced the 2014 optional standard mileage reimbursement rates.  Beginning January 1, 2014, they decrease one-half cent from the current rates in effect, and are as follows:

  • 56 cents per mile for business miles driven;
  • 23.5 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes; and
  • 14 cents per mile driven in service of charitable organizations (same as current rate in effect).

Employers using the standard IRS rates for mileage reimbursement purposes should adjust their expense reimbursement policies accordingly.

SF Family Friendly Workplace Poster Available

San Francisco employers are reminded that the city's new Family Friendly Workplace Ordinance (FFWO) takes effect January 1, 2014 and requires employers to consider employee requests for flexible or predictable work arrangements to assist with caregiving responsibilities.  Our prior post on this new ordinance is here.  This new local ordinance requires San Francisco employers with twenty or more employees to post a poster setting forth the provisions of the ordinance.  That poster has just been made available.  Employers can access the poster here.  For more information on the FFWO, click here.

Editor
Cal Labor Law

Robin E. Largent is a Partner in CDF’s Sacramento office and may be reached at 916.361.0991 or rlargent@cdflaborlaw.com BIO »

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